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The Goddesses of Death

Death and dying are morbid subjects, but, as we know, summer is drawing to a close and Autumn heralds the coming of Winter in the  Northern Hemisphere. (On the other hand, it is greening-up in the Southern Hemisphere, so now is the time to head to Australia.) The days grow...

Gods of Death

Fall has officially arrived, and with it Football Season, the World Series, festivals, county fairs, tailgate parties, bonfires, raking leaves, cleaning out gutters, changing filters, weatherizing drafty windows, rising heating bills and Death. Yes, this is the season when things are dying, and, because of global climate change, things are...

The Pagan’s Guide to Samhain, Part One

The Pagan’s Guide to Samhain, Part One Samhain, which looks like it should be pronounced "Sam Hane" but is pronounced "Sow-hen," means the "End of Summer." It takes place six weeks after the Autumn Equinox (Mabon) and six weeks before the Winter Solstice (Yule.) Essentially, it is the same thing...

The Old Gods and the New

As Warner Bros. did for Classical Music, and Tolkien and Marvel Comics did for Norse mythology, so George R.R. Martin did for Greek, Irish and Celtic mythology by providing us with a sort-of primer of the Old Gods and the New as described in the HBO series "Game of Thrones." ...

The Pagan’s Guide to Mabon

Mabon is the second autumn harvest holiday in the Wheel of the Year. It takes place at the Autumnal Equinox, when the days and nights are of equal length, around September 21st, which, to the Muggles, is considered the First Day of Autumn. HISTORY OF MABON:Even though people around the...

The Pagan’s Guide to Lammas

The Pagan’s Guide to Lammas You remember I said that Lughnasadh was celebrated by the Irish, the Scots, the Manx, the Celts, the Gaels, the Neopagans and the Wiccans but not the English? That's because instead, the English celebrated Lammas, which is also on August 1, (and is pronounced “Lamb...

The Pagan’s Guide to Lughnasadh

The Pagan’s Guide to Lughnasadh The harvest holiday of Lughnasadh (pronounced "leh-nassa") is celebrated on or around August I (which is a Wednesday this year) in the Northern Hemisphere, and around February 2nd in the Southern Hemisphere. It is halfway between the Summer Solstice (Litha) and the Autumnal Equinox (Mabon.)...

The Pagan’s Guide to Litha

The Summer Solstice, called "Litha" by Wiccans and Neopagans, is on June 21st this year. In the Northern Hemisphere, it is the longest day and the shortest night of the year. (Conversely, in the Southern Hemisphere, June 21st has the longest night and the shortest day of the year.) It...

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